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Revisiting the Required Technology Course: Making Learning Contextual and Meaningful!
PROCEEDINGS

, , , Iowa State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Teacher educators are constantly faced with developing effective and innovative approaches for teaching preservice and inservice teachers not only how to use technology, but how to teach with technology. To this effect, a mainstay in many teacher education programs is the required instructional technology course. This paper provides a description of how one institution redesigned this course so preservice teachers begin to learn how to solve instructional problems using technology and to make the learning contextual and meaningful for the preservice teachers. The course concepts also require students to skillfully apply technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) to their teaching practice and classroom environment. Descriptions of course activities and assessments along with anecdotal evaluation data from students are reported.

Citation

Schmidt, D., Garrety, C. & Gakhar, S. (2007). Revisiting the Required Technology Course: Making Learning Contextual and Meaningful!. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2263-2266). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 24, 2019 from .

Keywords

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