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The Relationship of E-Learner Satisfaction, E-Learning Self-Efficacy and Perceived Usefulness
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, Alliant International University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The attraction of utilizing technology to deliver knowledge is due to the immediate benefits associated with it. It is fast, cheap, and it gets the job done. Today, implementing e-learning is common practice in public and private sectors, but questions continue to emerge within the literature. "How do we determine the success of online learning?" Do we evaluate e-learning the same as traditional learning? Despite the amount of money invested in e-learning, organizations have not met the supposed economic gains. Consequently, continued research is needed to identify accurate evaluation measures for e-learning programs. The purpose of this study is to explore online learning theoretically and to identify key factors (e-learner satisfaction, perceived usefulness, and e-learning self-efficacy) that will enhance its effectiveness. Specifically, the research will explore the relationship of e-learner satisfaction, e-learning self-efficacy, and perceived usefulness. This paper presents results of a pilot survey administered to government employees who completed online mandatory courses.

Citation

Womble, J. (2006). The Relationship of E-Learner Satisfaction, E-Learning Self-Efficacy and Perceived Usefulness. In T. Reeves & S. Yamashita (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2006--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2494-2498). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 30, 2021 from .

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