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Exploring students' museum experiences in the context of web-based learning environments
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, , , University of Wollongong, Australia

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The paper examines the nature of school excursions to museums, and how the Internet, and in particular the web pages accompanying museum exhibitions, can be utilised to create authentic and complex learning environments for school students. The paper describes proposed research between a university and two leading museums that will investigate whether and how learners link web-based content and data in developing a broader perspective on the museum experience. It will explore in depth the use of the web to situate the onsite museum visit, not as a single one-off event, but within a complex task or problem-based learning approach that extends beyond the museum visit itself.

Citation

Harper, B., Brickell, G. & Herrington, J. (2006). Exploring students' museum experiences in the context of web-based learning environments. In T. Reeves & S. Yamashita (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2006--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1977-1983). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 19, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Exploring the pedagogical foundations of museum exhibitions and their websites

    Jan Herrington, Gwyn Brickell & Barry Harper, University of Wollongong, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2008 (Jun 30, 2008) pp. 4143–4151

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