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A Theoretical Framework for Online Inquiry-Based Learning
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, , The University of Georgia, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-58-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Current research on inquiry-based learning has biases by extensively focusing on the face-to-face contexts in the domains of mathematics and sciences and ignoring online contexts in other disciplines. This may be due to the following reasons. First, we have not developed a comprehensive view of current research on inquiry-based learning across different subject domains. Second, we have not systematically explored how the current relevant research on face-to-face learning contexts can be implemented in the online contexts. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to establish a theoretical framework of inquiry-based learning across different areas and analyze how this framework can be implemented in the online context. Further research directions of online inquiry-based learning have also been discussed in this paper.

Citation

Lin, J. & Tallman, J. (2006). A Theoretical Framework for Online Inquiry-Based Learning. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2006--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 967-974). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

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