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“Back to the Future”: A Review of Current Trends, Best Practices and Future Applications in Distance Education PROCEEDINGS

, , , Northwestern State University, United States ; , Northwestern State University College of Education, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-58-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstract: Distance education is the largest growth area in education. New trends and practices are underway that are just now appearing in the literature. This paper will review current trends and best practices in distance applications, assessment, attitudes, collaboration, concerns and challenges for faculty and students. A look back at trends and practices will provide the impetus for predicting future audiences and markets for distance education; a vehicle to expand services into underserved populations.

Citation

McBride, R., McFerrin, K., Gillan, R. & Monroe, M. (2006). “Back to the Future”: A Review of Current Trends, Best Practices and Future Applications in Distance Education. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2006--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 431-437). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 18, 2018 from .

Keywords

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