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Understanding Interactivity in Online Learning Environments: The Role of Social Presence & Cognitive Absorption in Student Satisfaction
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, , , University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-57-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Interaction has been identified as one of the major constructs in distance education research. However, a major obstacle facing researchers studying interaction and interactivity is that these terms have not been clearly or functionally defined to make the concept of interaction measurable and useful. Researchers studying interactions in computer-mediated communication (CMC) systems have used social presence theory to analyze interaction, communication and collaborative learning. Social presence has been determined to be a strong predictor of satisfaction within a CMC environment. Another vein of research that may shed some light on interaction and satisfaction in online learning environments is cognitive absorption theory. Cognitive absorption is defined as "a state of deep involvement with software." The purpose of this paper is to speculate on the possible role of social presence and cognitive absorption theory in online learning environments

Citation

Leong, P., Ho, C. & Zhang, S. (2005). Understanding Interactivity in Online Learning Environments: The Role of Social Presence & Cognitive Absorption in Student Satisfaction. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2005--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2170-2178). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 23, 2019 from .

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