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Game-Based Learning and Problem-solving Skills: A Systematic Review of the Literature
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, Texas A&M, United States ; , Texas A&M University, United States ; , Texas A&M, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Amsterdam, Netherlands ISBN 978-1-939797-42-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Trends in educational research and literature show an increasing interest in how games may influence learning. A few studies have looked at connections between gameplay and the development of different skills like problem-solving, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. However, much of the research to date has focused on the impact of games on motivation, engagement, and knowledge acquisition. In the last decade, the field has shifted its focus from the connection of games and tangible skills like knowledge acquisition or concept understanding, to more intangible learning outcomes such as the development of 21st century skills. 21st century skills refer to a wide range of skills such as critical thinking, collaboration, communication, problem-solving, and creativity. Among these skills, problem-solving is one of the highest taxonomic learning outcomes with an extensive application. This paper provides a comprehensive review of research from 2009 and 2016 on game-based learning and its impact on problem-solving skill development. The findings suggest that game-based learning nurtures problem-solving development across ages and academic levels. The elements featured most in the studies were collaboration and built-in feedback paired with interactivity. High interactivity promoted motivation and engagement, thereby impacting problem-solving skills, as increased motivation leads to persistence in finding solutions to problems addressed in the game.

Citation

Kailani, S., Newton, R. & Pedersen, S. (2019). Game-Based Learning and Problem-solving Skills: A Systematic Review of the Literature. In J. Theo Bastiaens (Ed.), Proceedings of EdMedia + Innovate Learning (pp. 1127-1137). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 19, 2021 from .