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Applications of Computational Thinking to Solve Graph Problems
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, University of North Texas at Dallas, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-37-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper focuses on the integration of computational thinking (CT) skills when applying graph theory to solving problems in mathematics courses in the general education core undergraduate university curriculum. Using example concepts from the mathematics curriculum, this paper demonstrates how key computational thinking skills including problem representation, problem reduction, problem transformation, algorithmic thinking, and recursion can be fostered without computer programming. Although CT shares elements with mathematical thinking (MT), and draws on a rich legacy of related representational and mental frameworks from MT, algorithmic thinking, and engineering thinking, it also extends MT skills in a unique way. MT and CT share several modes of thought, particularly in representation of reality, reduction to simpler problems, abstract reasoning, information structures, and algorithms. MT directly translates into thinking recursively, iteratively, abstractly, logically, precisely, and procedurally. Through these experiences students explicitly learn a number of critical CT principles and more importantly, develop a cognitive model for computational phenomena. It is the purpose of this paper to capitalize on the synergistic relationship between CT and MT to instill in students key computational thinking skills.

Citation

Rambally, G. (2019). Applications of Computational Thinking to Solve Graph Problems. In K. Graziano (Ed.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 324-329). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 24, 2019 from .

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