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Theory-Supported Problem-Based Cognitive Partnerships Spanning 3rd Grade To Higher Education: A Case Study
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, , University at Albany, State University of New York, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-56-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This article presents a unique case study about how a problem-based (PBL) higher education curriculum can integrate educational technology and information literacy theory to enhance student learning in 3rd grade. Faculty at the University at Albany have created cognitive learning partnerships with K-12 school districts to develop problem-based learning environments. School Library Media graduate students wrestle with theory and practice in real-world curriculum; undergraduate students develop Web pages based on the information theory research done by the graduate students; third graders learn about elections through educational technology. Problem-based cognitive learning partnerships permit K-12 districts to benefit from research-based best practices while at the same time offering opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students to experience real-life career situations in an educational environment. This study describes the linkage of cognitive partners at multiple stages in their education in a PBL environment.

Citation

Stefl-Mabry, J. & Goodall Powers, J. (2005). Theory-Supported Problem-Based Cognitive Partnerships Spanning 3rd Grade To Higher Education: A Case Study. In P. Kommers & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2130-2137). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved May 19, 2019 from .

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