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Outcomes from Technology Enhanced Informal Learning Activities to Increase Middle School Students’ Interest in STEM
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, , , , , , , , University of North Texas, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Amsterdam, Netherlands Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Seventh grade students participating in a four-hour hands-on technology enriched space science camp showed significant gains in their understanding of topics related to space science topics. Topics related to Apollo moon missions and the Parker Solar Probe mission were taught through innovative technology experiences such as augmented reality, virtual reality, 3D printing and robotics. Analysis of pre-post data revealed that space camp participants exhibited significant (p < .05) gains in content knowledge of space science topics related to landing men on the moon and sending a satellite probe to the sun while students also retained a high level of solar eclipse knowledge featured at the previous camp in 2017. Implications of these findings for expectations regarding potential contributions of informal learning to formal science concepts are discussed.

Citation

Christensen, R., Knezek, G., den Lepcha, S., Dong, D., Liu, S., Wang, K., Wu, A. & Yotchoum Nzia, H.A. (2018). Outcomes from Technology Enhanced Informal Learning Activities to Increase Middle School Students’ Interest in STEM. In T. Bastiaens, J. Van Braak, M. Brown, L. Cantoni, M. Castro, R. Christensen, G. Davidson-Shivers, K. DePryck, M. Ebner, M. Fominykh, C. Fulford, S. Hatzipanagos, G. Knezek, K. Kreijns, G. Marks, E. Sointu, E. Korsgaard Sorensen, J. Viteli, J. Voogt, P. Weber, E. Weippl & O. Zawacki-Richter (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 1368-1377). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 16, 2018 from .

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