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‘Throw and Run’ Early-Human Virtual Hunting Experience: An Interactive Archaeology-Learning Support System
PROCEEDING

, Tokyo University of Science, Japan ; , Tama Art University, Japan ; , Meiji Gakuin University, Japan ; , Hokkaido University, Japan ; , Tama Art University, Japan ; , Kobe University, Japan ; , Tokyo University of Science, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Amsterdam, Netherlands Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Experience-based learning is an effective learning model in children’s history education. However, there are many areas of history education that are difficult to experience, such as the life of early humans. An immersive history-learning support system is thus proposed that provides a simulated experience of early human lives. As a first step in this research, we developed a learning support system to provide this experience with respect to hunting for food. In this system, learners can perform as an early human hunter by running and throwing a spear in a virtual environment. This approach is expected to engender in learners the sensation of entering the early human environment by assuming the same movements as early hunters. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the immersive experience enabled by the developed system. In the experiment, elementary school students were tasked to employ the system.

Citation

Sako, N., Ozawa, T., Egusa, R., Sugimoto, M., Kusunoki, F., Inagaki, S. & Mizoguchi, H. (2018). ‘Throw and Run’ Early-Human Virtual Hunting Experience: An Interactive Archaeology-Learning Support System. In T. Bastiaens, J. Van Braak, M. Brown, L. Cantoni, M. Castro, R. Christensen, G. Davidson-Shivers, K. DePryck, M. Ebner, M. Fominykh, C. Fulford, S. Hatzipanagos, G. Knezek, K. Kreijns, G. Marks, E. Sointu, E. Korsgaard Sorensen, J. Viteli, J. Voogt, P. Weber, E. Weippl & O. Zawacki-Richter (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 1216-1221). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 22, 2019 from .

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