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Supporting peer interactions in a MOOC: Utilizing social networking tools to personalize learning
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, , Athabasca University, Canada ; , Curtin University, Australia

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-31-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This paper reports on the utilization of an online community networking platform designed to deliver a MOOC. A customized Elgg social software platform, implemented as the Curtin Learning Commons, was developed with social networking tools organized to support personalized learning. The MOOC, titled Participating in the Digital Age (PDA), engaged students in activities that used a variety of social media tools to access the educational content and experiences. The goals of the MOOC were to provide conceptual understandings and opportunities to participate in tasks exemplifying the topic. The study presents evidence that using these kinds of community software platforms to deliver a MOOC can provide higher education learners with personalized active learning opportunities. Further research on providing scaffolded support to enable learners to capitalize on additional aspects of networked learning such platforms would advance this use.

Citation

Ostashewski, N., Dron, J. & Howell, J. (2017). Supporting peer interactions in a MOOC: Utilizing social networking tools to personalize learning. In J. Dron & S. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 833-845). Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 24, 2019 from .

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