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Connected Teaching and Learning in K-16+ Contexts: An Annotated Bibliography

, Towson University, United States ; , University of Illinois at Chicago, United States ; , Illinois State University, United States ; , William & Mary, United States ; , University of Illinois at Chicago, United States ; , William & Mary, United States

CITE Journal Volume 18, Number 2, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Connected learning is “an emerging, synthetic model of learning whose principles are consistent with those of positive youth development, sociocultural learning theory, and findings from ethnographic studies of young people’s interest-related interactions with digital media” (Maul et al., 2017, p. 2). It seeks to harness new media technologies and human networks to support interest-driven, production-centered learning that bridges in- and out-of-school and intergenerational disconnects. As such, “it is a fundamentally different mode of learning than education centered on fixed subjects, one-to-many instruction, and standardized testing…” (Connected Learning Alliance, n.d.). The connected learning model has spread rapidly and widely; it has been taken up in the design of programs, courses, and research across interdisciplinary, international, and in- and out-of-school contexts. The goal for this annotated bibliography is to provide an overview of connected learning theory and research that is most relevant to teaching and learning in K-16+ school settings, which can serve as a resource for those interested in connected learning practice and outcomes.

Citation

Lohnes Watulak, S., Woodard, R., Smith, A., Johnson, L., Phillips, N. & Wargo, K. (2018). Connected Teaching and Learning in K-16+ Contexts: An Annotated Bibliography. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 18(2), 289-312. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved September 18, 2018 from .

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References

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