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Education Required for Digital Art in the Future: From the Education Theory of A Modern Artist
PROCEEDING

, , Tohoku University, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Washington, DC ISBN 978-1-939797-29-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

In order for digital art to be widely recognized as works of art in the future and to produce works that will be appreciated by later generations, it is necessary to study the methods of digital art education. Takashi Murakami (1962- ) is a modern artist representing Japan. He incorporates Japan’s original popular culture, such as anime, manga, and “kawaii” design, into his own works. Currently, Murakami works with about 200 apprentices in his studio. He adopts an unusual production style in which works are created as he trains these students. Because modern digital art works cannot be created by a single person, Murakami’s production style and educational methods provide major implications for the production of digital art and education of digital artists. The purpose of this paper is to derive essences of Murakami’s art education by analyzing conversations between Murakami and his apprentices (almost all of whom are art college students) during the production of a work.

Citation

Usui, S. & Sato, K. (2017). Education Required for Digital Art in the Future: From the Education Theory of A Modern Artist. In J. Johnston (Ed.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2017 (pp. 909-912). Washington, DC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .