You are here:

Taking Blended Learning to Graduate Teacher Education:Examining a Blending Strategy
PROCEEDING

, , George Mason University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Most definitions describe blended learning as a combination of face-to-face and online elements and do not incorporate the interactions of content, activities, assignments, and meetings. When activities and modalities are central considerations, blended learning can be a rational approach to the design of instruction. For this study, a matrix was created combining activity categories and instructional modalities to structure a blending strategy. Using the matrix and affordance-based analysis, five blended learning courses were created and taught during the 2015-2016 academic year. Researchers asked: Were instructors’ decisions about the alignment of activity and instructional modality consistent with teacher-learners’ instructional modality choices? Overall, data suggest that the blending strategy used provided a learning experience consistent with teacher-learner choices. The authors discuss four lessons about the design of blended learning that can be derived from the study.

Citation

Hathaway, D. & Norton, P. (2017). Taking Blended Learning to Graduate Teacher Education:Examining a Blending Strategy. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 510-517). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 20, 2019 from .

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References

Slides