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Social Media and Seamless Learning: Lessons Learned
PROCEEDING

, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States ; , Cologne University of Applied Science, United States ; , Helmholtz Association, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Washington, DC, United States Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The paper discusses best practice approaches and metrics for evaluation that support seamless learning with social media. We draw upon the theoretical frameworks of social learning theory, transfer learning (bricolage), and educational design patterns to elaborate upon different ideas for ways in which social media can support seamless learning. To exemplify how social media can support seamless learning we follow up with presenting three case studies on the organizational level, on the program level, and on the individual level. Each case study analyzes the context for the use of social media, followed by a discussion of how social media serves as a catalyst for seamless learning.

Citation

Panke, S., Kohls, C. & Gaiser, B. (2016). Social Media and Seamless Learning: Lessons Learned. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning (pp. 1235-1244). Washington, DC, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 20, 2019 from .

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