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THREE COMPUTERS IN THE BACK OF THE CLASSROOM: PRESERVICE TEACHERS’ CONCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION
PROCEEDINGS

, , Boston College, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Norfolk, VA ISBN 978-1-880094-41-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Faced with a new generation of pre-service teachers, teacher educators may easily assume that these young men and women are technology savvy and have mastered the skills required to word process, create presentations, surf the web, email professors and friends, and conduct their research online. Nevertheless, these same pre-service teachers may express anxiety and doubt about their ability to incorporate technology into their future classrooms. Our study, based on interviews with pre-service teachers, looks at this disconnect between using technology with confidence for personal use and using technology as an educator. We consider possible sources for this disconnect, and offer an alternative conception of technology in education we call “technological pedagogical content knowledge” (TPCK) which extends beyond computer proficiency to understanding the effect technology may have on student's conceptions of subject matter, the inevitable challenges that accompany technology, and the judicious use of technology when new forms of representation are most appropriate.

Citation

Keating, T. & Evans, E. (2001). THREE COMPUTERS IN THE BACK OF THE CLASSROOM: PRESERVICE TEACHERS’ CONCEPTIONS OF TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION. In J. Price, D. Willis, N. Davis & J. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2001--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1671-1676). Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 24, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. PCK and TPCK/TPACK: More than Etiology

    Michael Phillips, Faculty of Education, Monash University, Australia; Judi Harris, William & Mary School of Education, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2109–2116

  2. A Case Study of a TPACK-Based Approach to Teacher Professional Development:Teaching Science With Blogs

    Kamini Jaipal-Jamani & Candace Figg, Brock University, Canada

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 15, No. 2 (June 2015) pp. 161–200

  3. Situating TPACK in the Teacher Knowledge Base: Creating a Shared Theoretical Vision

    Leighann Forbes, Gannon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (Mar 25, 2013) pp. 5048–5053

  4. Using TPACK-in-Practice to Design Technology Professional Learning Opportunities for Teachers

    Kamini Jaipal & Candace Figg, Brock University, Canada; Jenny Burson, University of Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (Mar 05, 2012) pp. 4710–4717

  5. TPACK-in-Practice: Developing 21st Century Teacher Knowledge

    Candace Figg & Kamini Jaipal, Brock University, Canada

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (Mar 05, 2012) pp. 4683–4689

  6. The Influence of Computer Use on Pre-service Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Social Studies

    Margaret Crocco, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States; Stephen Thornton, University of South Florida, United States; Thomas Chandler, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2006 (Mar 19, 2006) pp. 4074–4079

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