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Faculty Motivation & Intent to Teach Online
PROCEEDINGS

, Georgia Regents University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Kona, Hawaii, United States Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The unified theory of user acceptance of technology, Motivation Orientation Scale Faculty Version, and Individual Innovativeness Scale were used to predict faculty intent to teach online, understand motivators to teach online, & the relationship between innovativeness & intent to teach online. A sample of 348 self-selected faculty at a public research university in the U.S. responded to a survey. Results demonstrated that slightly more faculty than not reported behavioral intent to teach online. Multiple regression analysis indicated performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, motivation orientation to teach online, motivation to teach face-to-face, sex, & level of innovation statistically & significantly predict intent to teach online. Analysis indicated motivation orientation to teach online, motivation to teach face-to-face, social influence, effort expectancy, & sex were the optimal combination of constructs within this sample to predict intent to teach online.

Citation

Casdorph, M. (2015). Faculty Motivation & Intent to Teach Online. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1726-1734). Kona, Hawaii, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved May 21, 2019 from .

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