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Players, features, and enjoyment: Entertainment games as models for educational games
PROCEEDINGS

, , , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study examines reviews of some of the highest and lowest ranked video games on VideoGameGeek.com in order to determine what features video game players see as contributing to or detracting from enjoyment in games as well as how these features align with an established taxonomy of game features. Results suggest that players perceive features like control, challenge, and immersion to have more of an effect on enjoyment than a game’s story or such features as interaction with and feedback from the game. The data also suggest that players consider factors outside of previously-identified categories to play an important role in their enjoyment of video games. A better understanding of the connections between specific game features and reported enjoyment may enable educational game designers and teachers to design and select games that are more likely to engage learners.

Citation

Owens Boltz, L., Arnold, B. & Greenhalgh, S. (2015). Players, features, and enjoyment: Entertainment games as models for educational games. In D. Rutledge & D. Slykhuis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2015--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 822-829). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Design Principles for Creating and Maintaining Immersive Experiences in Educational Games

    Brian Arnold, Matthew Koehler & Spencer Greenhalgh, Michigan State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 502–508

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