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The Effects of Technology-Mediated Instructional Strategies on Motivation, Performance, and Self-Directed Learning
PROCEEDINGS

, Florida State University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-48-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Using a quasi-experimental research design, this study examined the effects of technology-mediated instructional strategies on motivation, performance, and self-directed learning. The subjects in this study were undergraduate students enrolled in a tuition-free, public military school in the Northeast United States. 784 students, representing approximately 20% of the population at the academy, were randomly divided into control and experimental groups for each of 17 instructors in the study. Interventions were developed using Keller's Attention-Relevance-Confidence-Satisfaction (ARCS) model of motivational design and were delivered via PDA, web, and other technologies. Quantitative and qualitative data was collected on self-directed learning, motivation, and performance. Findings revealed that there were significant differences between performance of students who accessed the technology-mediated instructional strategies and those who did not access the strategies.

Citation

Gabrielle, D. (2003). The Effects of Technology-Mediated Instructional Strategies on Motivation, Performance, and Self-Directed Learning. In D. Lassner & C. McNaught (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2003--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2568-2575). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

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