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Decision-Making, Design, and Development…Oh My! Investment in a Custom-Built, Cloud-Based, Lesson-Authoring Tool
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, Rothenberger Institute, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-05-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Lesson-authoring tools that require a Flash player no longer accommodate the anytime, anywhere learning that online learners have come to expect, as many smartphones and tablets do not support Flash. Further, developing, delivering, and updating customized, media-rich lesson content presents challenges not always easily resolved with desktop authoring tools. Moreover, technology tools alone do not provide meaningful learning; innovative, educational technologies must also be learner-centered, capable of facilitating strategic pedagogical frameworks. In this paper, I will provide an overview of the decision-making and development processes undertaken by the Rothenberger Institute at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, given our unique and specific organizational needs, in our investment in a custom-built, cloud-based, lesson-authoring tool.

Citation

LimBybliw, A. (2013). Decision-Making, Design, and Development…Oh My! Investment in a Custom-Built, Cloud-Based, Lesson-Authoring Tool. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2013--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2451-2456). Las Vegas, NV, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 25, 2019 from .

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