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Computers in Early Childhood Classrooms: Experiences of Three Kindergartens in Taiwan PROCEEDINGS

, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taiwan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Washington, DC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-54-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study examined how computers were used in three kindergarten classrooms in Taiwan. The research questions of the study were how computers are integrated into early childhood curriculum? And what is the teacher's role in young children's learning with computers? Classroom observations and teacher interviews were conducted to investigate the research questions. The results reveal that although computers were used in kindergartens, they were not successfully integrated into the curriculum. The emphasis of computer activities was on young children's computer competences, and they used drill and structured software mostly in the classroom. In addition, kindergarten teachers tended to use direct instruction to facilitate young children's learning with computers.

Citation

Liang, P.H. (2004). Computers in Early Childhood Classrooms: Experiences of Three Kindergartens in Taiwan. In J. Nall & R. Robson (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2004--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2385-2390). Washington, DC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 20, 2018 from .

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