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Structured Communities, Science Instruction Development, And The Use Of Blogging In A Pre-Service Elementary Teacher Education Program
ARTICLE

, , , University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 22, Number 3, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This study evaluates the use of blogging and what it reveals about the development of science teaching ability in pre-service elementary education majors. The investigation occurs in a structured community and takes into consideration interactions among community members as they reflect on their own experiences and respond to the blogs of other pre-service teachers (PSTs) during a science methods course. The goal of the project was to develop as a virtual place where content or procedural knowledge is valued, learned and shared by members beyond face-to-face interactions. This paper is intended to address, evaluate and encourage the use of blogging amongst pre-service teachers specifically focused on science teacher education. This appraisal was conducted by looking at the activity and the experiences of the pre-service teachers, and the role that blogging played in their interactions and growth as pedagogues. The project reveals that blogging can be a useful as a tool in pre-service education because the practices and thought processes of PSTs are revealed and shared beyond face-to-face interactions. Development was mitigated by how PSTs processed new experiences, the trust and interaction that occurred between the participants, and the gradual acceptance of blogging as a beneficial academic practice.

Citation

Wall, S., Anderson, J. & Justice, J. (2014). Structured Communities, Science Instruction Development, And The Use Of Blogging In A Pre-Service Elementary Teacher Education Program. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 22(3), 361-395. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved July 18, 2019 from .

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  • Peer Communication Through Blogging

    Steve Wall & Janice Anderson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 15, No. 4 (December 2015) pp. 514–540

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