You are here:

Case Study: Initial Misconceptions of Novice Online Learners and the Implications for Supportive Instructional Design
PROCEEDINGS

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-48-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Since 1997, Teachers College, Columbia University has been providing online graduate courses. With the proliferation of online courses now available, more and more students are trying this distance learning format for the first time. This case study was conducted to assess expectations of novice online learners. From the data, we found novice learners have four initial misconceptions about online classes related to academic vigor, accountability, issues of time and instructor contact. Additionally, we discovered novice learners cite two main factors as contributing to academic success, namely course organization and instructor contact. From these findings, we suggest several practical design recommendations to facilitate novice learner success in online learning courses.

Citation

. (2003). Case Study: Initial Misconceptions of Novice Online Learners and the Implications for Supportive Instructional Design. In D. Lassner & C. McNaught (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2003--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1713-1718). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 1, 2021 from .

Keywords

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References