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Preparing Tomorrow's Science Teachers to Use Technology: Guidelines for Science Educators
Article

, Oregon State Univ., United States ; , Univ. of Virginia, United States

CITE Journal Volume 1, Number 1, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Science and technology education have enjoyed a meaningful partnership across most of this century. The work of scientists embraces an array of technologies, and major accomplishments in science are often accompanied by sophisticated applications of technology. As a result, a complete science education has, in principle, involved a commitment to the inclusion of technology, both as a tool for learning science content and processes and as a topic of instruction in itself (American Association for the Advancement of Science [AAAS], 1993; National Research Council [NRC], 1996). These elements have traditionally been a part of teacher education in secondary science.

Science education has generally involved teaching not only a body of knowledge but also the processes and activities of scientific work. This view has linked the scientific uses of technology with hands-on experiences. The term "hands-on science" was descriptive of the major curriculum reform projects of the 1960s and became a label for a revolution in teaching science through the next two decades (Flick, 1993). So-called "hands-on science" instruction impacted teacher education as new curricula made its way into preservice courses. Teacher education was also influenced by teaching methods, such as the learning cycle (Lawson, Abraham, & Renner, 1989), based on theories of student learning that implied the necessity of interacting with physical materials.

Citation

Flick, L. & Bell, R. (2000). Preparing Tomorrow's Science Teachers to Use Technology: Guidelines for Science Educators. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 1(1), 39-60. Charlottesville, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved December 15, 2019 from .

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