You are here:

World History Teachers' Use of Digital Primary Sources: The Effect of Training
ARTICLE

Theory and Research in Social Education Volume 34, Number 1, ISSN 0093-3104

Abstract

Through surveys, interviews, observations, and field notes, I examined the beliefs and practices of six high school world history teachers regarding the use of digital primary sources and the potential added value of formal training in technology as a tool for instruction. Access to equipment (namely computer projectors and school computing facilities) was paramount in terms of digital primary source use; teachers with high levels of access to computing equipment were high-frequency users of digital primary sources, while those without access were not. While formal training did not necessarily result in an increased use of digital primary sources, it did affect the manner in which they were used. Teachers with low levels of technology training tended to use digital primary sources as an additive to their instruction instead of as a vehicle from which to engage students in historical thinking. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

Citation

Friedman, A.M. (2006). World History Teachers' Use of Digital Primary Sources: The Effect of Training. Theory and Research in Social Education, 34(1), 124-141. Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Digital Inquiry About and With Words

    Tina Heafner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States; Nicolas Triplett, UNC Charlotte, United States; Dixie Massey, University of Washington, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 2185–2189

  2. “Computer as Data Gatherer” for a New Generation: Martorella’s Predictions, the Past, the Present, and the Future of Technology in Social Studies

    Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 14, No. 1 (March 2014) pp. 10–24

  3. Editorial: 15 Years after Martorella's Sleeping Giant: A Year of Special Themed Issues

    Meghan M. Manfra, North Carolina State University, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 14, No. 1 (March 2014) pp. 1–9

  4. Gender Differences in Technology Integration

    Tina Heafner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (Mar 17, 2014) pp. 2841–2851

  5. A Year of Reflection: The More Things Change

    Mark Pearcy, Rider University, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 13, No. 4 (December 2013) pp. 360–385

  6. Navigating Access and Maintaining Established Practice: Social Studies Teachers’ Technology Integration at Three Florida Middle Schools

    Caroline Sheffield, University of Louisville, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 11, No. 3 (September 2011) pp. 282–312

  7. Preservice Social Studies Teachers’ Historical Thinking and Digitized Primary Sources: What They Use and Why

    Cinthia Salinas & M. Elizabeth Bellows, The University of Texas at Austin, United States; H. Leonard Liaw, unknown, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 11, No. 2 (June 2011) pp. 184–204

  8. Using Primary Sources in Math and Science – An Examination of How Engaging, Challenging, and Effective Teachers Rate Lesson Plans

    Natalie Milman, George Washington University, United States; Rhonda Clevenson, Primary Source Learning, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2009 (Mar 02, 2009) pp. 3809–3812

  9. “…You think for me, so I don’t have to.” The Effect of a Technology-Enhanced, Inquiry Learning Environment on Student Learning in 11th grade United States History

    Adam M. Friedman, Wake Forest University, United States; Tina L. Heafner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 7, No. 3 (September 2007) pp. 199–216

  10. Guest Editorial: The State of the Field: Technology, Social Studies, and Teacher Education

    Adam M. Friedman, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States; David Hicks, Virginia Tech, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 6, No. 2 (June 2006) pp. 246–258

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.