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Dividing the Digital Divide: Instructional Use of Computers in Social Studies
ARTICLE

Theory and Research in Social Education Volume 35, Number 2, ISSN 0093-3104

Abstract

This article explores the impact of social class setting on the instructional decisions made by four high school social studies teachers in utilizing computers in their classrooms. First, teachers in different settings had dissimilar views of the educational futures of their students. Second, the students with the highest and lowest social class status used computers more for school assignments than other students. Third, teachers in the two higher social class settings provided instruction that gave their students more access to higher status knowledge than did the teachers in the two lower social class settings. (Contains 3 tables.)

Citation

DeWitt, S.W. (2007). Dividing the Digital Divide: Instructional Use of Computers in Social Studies. Theory and Research in Social Education, 35(2), 277-304. Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

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Cited By

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  3. Commentary: Revisiting “Guidelines for Using Technology to Prepare Social Studies Teachers”

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    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 15, No. 2 (June 2015) pp. 201–208

  4. Revisiting the "Sleeping Giant" Metaphor: Is It Still Sleeping in the Commonwealth of Virginia, and Is It Still Really a Giant?

    Hicks David, Virginia Tech, United States; Stephanie van Hover, University of Virginia, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 14, No. 2 (June 2014) pp. 141–157

  5. Gender Differences in Technology Integration

    Tina Heafner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (Mar 17, 2014) pp. 2841–2851

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