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Listen to the Natives
ARTICLE

Educational Leadership Volume 63, Number 4, ISSN 0013-1784

Abstract

“Digital natives” refer to today's students because they are native speakers of technology, fluent in the digital language of computers, video games, and the Internet. Those who were not born into the digital world are referred to as digital immigrants. Educators, considered digital immigrants, have slid into the 21st century–and into the digital age–still doing a great many things the old way. Times have changed and so, too, have the students, the tools, and the requisite skills and knowledge. As such, it's time for education leaders to raise their heads above the daily grind and observe the new landscape that's emerging. In this article, the author discusses what today's teachers and school need to do in order to keep up with the constantly changing educational needs of “digital natives.”

Citation

Prensky, M. (2006). Listen to the Natives. Educational Leadership, 63(4), 8-13. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

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