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The Role of Social Comments in Problem-Solving Groups in an Online Class
ARTICLE

American Journal of Distance Education Volume 18, Number 2, ISSN 0892-3647

Abstract

This grounded theory article focuses on the role of social communications during an online group problem-solving class. The proposed theory states that students working collaboratively and asynchronously with people they do not know use social comments to overcome emotional and geographical distance feelings. The subthemes of self-revelation, tying, and etiquette enabled students to “connect” to group members, group process, and the learning content. The contextual subtheme of technology provided a framework for messages. Social commentary constructed a foundation for problem-solving activities. Instructors are encouraged to consider enhancing social connections as a means of accomplishing primary course objectives.

Citation

Molinari, D.L. (2004). The Role of Social Comments in Problem-Solving Groups in an Online Class. American Journal of Distance Education, 18(2), 89-101. Retrieved April 22, 2019 from .

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