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Second-Level Digital Divide: Differences in People's Online Skills ARTICLE

First Monday Volume 7, Number 4, ISSN 1396-0466

Abstract

Discussion of the digital divide in access to the Internet focuses on differences in people's online skills and therefore access to information based on age, gender, and technology experience. Findings suggest wide differences in search strategies, ability to find various types of content, and how long it takes. Demographics of respondents are appended. (LRW)

Citation

Hargittai, E. (2002). Second-Level Digital Divide: Differences in People's Online Skills. First Monday, 7(4),. Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

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