You are here:

Gender and Computer-Mediated Communication: An Exploration of Elementary Students’ Mathematics and Science Learning
Article

, University of Calgary, Canada

JCMST Volume 21, Number 4, ISSN 0731-9258 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Although computer-mediated communication (CMC)-its technology, its contents, and usage patterns-is still in the process of rapid change, the use of CMC such as the Internet as a teaching-learning tool is increasing dramatically. However, very few research studies have examined the gender differences of the characteristic of communication and interaction. This study, therefore, examines gender differences in student communication and interaction in the context of mathematics and science learning using CMC. In this study, 22 elementary students' interaction and communication patterns using CMC are examined. The results of the data analysis show that, first, it remains clear that gender is still a factor that needs to be considered in the context of mathematics and science learning using CMC. In terms of communication patterns, male students, compared to their female counterparts, are more likely to present their opinions and explanations, but less likely to making specific suggestions; whereas female students tend to ask for a lot of information, but are less likely to provide explanations and/or present their opinions. Particularly, they are less likely to start discussions by "giving explanation." In addition, female students tend to initiate conversations, while male students are more likely to enter the dialogue at later stages and respond to previous discussions.

Citation

Li, Q. (2002). Gender and Computer-Mediated Communication: An Exploration of Elementary Students’ Mathematics and Science Learning. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 21(4), 341-359. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved May 27, 2019 from .

Keywords

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References

Cited By

View References & Citations Map

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.