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Problematizing Complex Datasets for Students: Design Principles for Inquiry Curriculum
PROCEEDINGS

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American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting,

Abstract

Recent advances in computer technologies have provided new tools for accessing complex data for classroom inquiry. The effectiveness of these tools for learning depends on the extent to which students learn to engage them reflectively. From an analysis of the design of an earth science inquiry unit using complex datasets, the authors (researchers and a middle school science teacher) propose four design principles that promise to be effective in promoting the development of reflective inquiry habits and skills. These are: (1) cultivating the need for data; (2) introducing data through students' work; (3) promoting debate with evidence; and (4) building inquiry on earlier products of students' work. (Contains 8 figures and 19 references.) (Author/SLD)

Citation

Radinsky, J., Loh, B., Mundt, J., Marshall, S., Gomez, L.M., Reiser, B.J. & Edelson, D.C. (1999). Problematizing Complex Datasets for Students: Design Principles for Inquiry Curriculum. Presented at American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting 1999. Retrieved October 22, 2019 from .

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