You are here:

On-Line Education: A Study of Emerging Pedagogy
ARTICLE

New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education Volume 78, ISSN 1052-2891

Abstract

Online courses raise instructional concerns about goals, philosophy, changes in teaching and teacher roles, and evaluation. Creating interactivity is a crucial issue. Organizational issues include face-to-face components, group interaction, and prerequisites. Institutions must be concerned about faculty incentives, access and equity, ongoing evaluation, and technical support. (SK)

Citation

Schrum, L. (1998). On-Line Education: A Study of Emerging Pedagogy. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 78, 53-61. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. The Use of Online Tutoring to Promote Higher-Level Thinking Skills in English Language Learners using Asynchronous Discussion Boards in Teacher Preparation Programs

    Claudia R. Rodas, Northern Arizona University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 2286–2289

  2. E-Learning in Higher Education – Opportunities & Challenges for Dubai

    Theophilus K. Gokah, The Mena Institute, United Arab Emirates; Namrata Gupta, University of Wollongong, United Arab Emirates; Esinath Ndiweni, Herriot Watt University, United Arab Emirates

    International Journal on E-Learning Vol. 14, No. 4 (2015) pp. 443–470

  3. The Relationship Between Self-Regulation and Online Learning in a Blended Learning Context

    Richard Lynch & Myron Dembo

    The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning Vol. 5, No. 2 (Aug 01, 2004)

  4. Working Together: The Context of Teams in an Online MBA Program

    Martha Gabriel, Colla MacDonald & Colla MacDonald

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 28, No. 2 (Jun 15, 2002)

  5. Supporting Distance Students Using the Internet: A Brazilian Experience

    Marialice De Moraes, Carolina Rodrigues Paz, Flavia Lumi Matuzawa & Patricia Jantsch

    The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning Vol. 4, No. 1 (Apr 01, 2003)

  6. Virtual Schooling Standards and Best Practices for Teacher Education

    Richard E. Ferdig & Cathy Cavanaugh, University of Florida, United States; Meredith DiPietro, University of North Carolina Charlotte, United States; Erik W. Black & Kara Dawson, University of Florida, United States

    Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 17, No. 4 (October 2009) pp. 479–503

  7. Utilization of Instructional Technologies in a Nigerian University: Pedagogical Gaps and Policy Options

    Martins Fabunmi, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2009 (Mar 02, 2009) pp. 1191–1196

  8. Analysis of graduate students’ access and utilization of e-learning technology in a Nigerian university

    Martins Fabunmi, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; Beatrice Fabunmi, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria; Eseza Akiror Erwat, Lead City university, Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2008 (Mar 03, 2008) pp. 1883–1888

  9. A Web-based Graduate Course on Evaluation: An Attempt to Minimize Distances in Brazilian Education

    Ligia Gomes Elliot, Fundação Cesgranrio, Brazil; Angela Carrancho da silva, FUNDAÇAO CESGRANRIO, Brazil; Christina Marília Teixeira da Silva, Fundação Cesgranrio, Brazil

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2007 (Jun 25, 2007) pp. 3512–3519

  10. A Typology for Identifying Teachers’ Progress in ICT uptake

    Ron Oliver & Barney Clarkson, Edith Cowan University, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2002 (2002) pp. 317–322

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.