You are here:

New Technologies and Gender Equity: New Bottles with Old Wine
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology,

Abstract

Educational practice is influenced, in part, by the constant visualization of gender stereotypes throughout society in various forms, in both the old and new technologies. The imagery of computer technology as male turf has been carried into the World Wide Web through graphic advertisements. Male administrators make decisions about school practice that influence the implementation of new distance education technologies. The pervasive message of gender stereotypes has a tremendous influence on children and adults, and can bring biased value systems into what seems to be otherwise technologically innovative environments. The paper discusses developing male and female stereotypes; culture and groups; and gender stereotypes in print media, television, cyberspace, and ITV educational environments. Instructional designers can influence the educational industry, home market, school environment, and practices in business and military environments. Instructional designers can influence educational practice by designing instructional environments that attend to the needs of the female population as well as those of the males. Even though the majority of network users are males, females must be encouraged to learn skills and be provided with opportunities to have equal access to information. (Contains 41 references.) (SWC)

Citation

Knupfer, N.N. (1997). New Technologies and Gender Equity: New Bottles with Old Wine. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1997. Retrieved January 27, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords