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Effects of Short-Term Memory and Content Representation Type on Mobile Language Learning
ARTICLE

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Language Learning & Technology Volume 12, Number 3, ISSN 1094-3501

Abstract

Due to the rapid advancements in mobile communication and wireless technologies, many researchers and educators have started to believe that these emerging technologies can be leveraged to support formal and informal learning opportunities. Mobile language learning can be effectively implemented by delivering learning content through mobile phones. Because the screen size of mobile phones is limited, the presentation of materials using different Learning Content Representation (LCR) types is an issue that needs to be explored. This study addresses the issue of content adaptation in mobile language learning environments. Two dimensions have been taken into consideration to identify a promising solution: instructional strategies (LCR types: written annotation and pictorial annotation), and learners' cognitive models (verbal and visual short-term memory). Our findings show that providing learning content with pictorial annotation in a mobile language learning environment can help learners with lower verbal and higher visual ability because such learners find it easier to learn content presented in a visual rather than in a verbal form. Providing learning content with both written and pictorial annotation can also help learners with both high verbal and high visual abilities. According to the Cognitive Load Theory, providing too much information may produce a higher cognitive load and lead to irritation and a lack of concentration. Our findings also suggest that providing just the basic learning materials is more helpful to learners with low verbal and visual abilities. (Contains 6 figures and 5 tables.)

Citation

Chen, N.S., Hsieh, S.W. & , K. (2008). Effects of Short-Term Memory and Content Representation Type on Mobile Language Learning. Language Learning & Technology, 12(3), 93-113. Retrieved December 6, 2019 from .

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