You are here:

Blending Physical and Virtual Manipulatives: An Effort to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding through Science Laboratory Experimentation
ARTICLE

,

Science Education Volume 96, Number 1, ISSN 0036-8326

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the effect of experimenting with physical manipulatives (PM), virtual manipulatives (VM), and a blended combination of PM and VM on undergraduate students' understanding of concepts in the domain of “Light and Color.” A pre-post comparison study design was used for the purposes of this study that involved 70 participants assigned to three conditions. The first condition consisted of 23 students that used PM, the second condition consisted of 23 students that used VM, and the third condition consisted of 24 students that used the blended combination of PM and VM. In the case of the blended combination, the use of VM or PM was selected based on whether it provides an affordance that the other medium of experimentation (PM or VM) cannot provide. All conditions used the same inquiry-oriented curriculum materials and procedures. Conceptual tests were administered to assess students' understanding before, during, and after teaching. Results revealed that the use of a blended combination of PM and VM enhanced students' conceptual understanding in the domain of “Light and Color” more than the use of PM or VM alone. (Contains 4 tables and 3 figures.)

Citation

Olympiou, G. & Zacharia, Z.C. (2012). Blending Physical and Virtual Manipulatives: An Effort to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding through Science Laboratory Experimentation. Science Education, 96(1), 21-47. Retrieved April 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Comparison of Technology Use Between Biology and Physics Teachers in a 1:1 Laptop Environment

    Simon J. Crook, Manjula D. Sharma & Rachel Wilson, University of Sydney, Australia

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 15, No. 2 (June 2015) pp. 126–160

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.