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Communication Aids in the Classroom: The Views of Education Staff and Speech and Language Therapists Involved with the Communication Aids Project
ARTICLE

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British Journal of Special Education Volume 33, Number 1, ISSN 0952-3383

Abstract

The findings presented in this paper are part of an independent evaluation study of the Communication Aids Project (CAP). The study was carried out between July 2003 and April 2004 and looked at the impact of CAP on children receiving communication aids and evaluated the CAP strategy of assessment and delivery. In this paper the views of education staff and speech and language therapists who were working with communication aid users in school are presented. The professionals who were interviewed provided positive feedback on the existence of CAP, on the assessment for the communication aid, particularly where the use of the aid in the classroom was considered, and on the children's increased participation in classroom and learning activities since receiving the aid. They also highlighted the issue of managing parents' expectations regarding the use of aids and the value of and need for continued training for professionals working with communication aids in the classroom. The authors of this article, Jannet Wright, senior lecturer, Chris Donlan, senior lecturer, Caroline Newton, lecturer, and Michael Clarke, lecturer, from University College London; Claire Lister, from the Institute of Child Health, London; and Jasmina Cherguit, assistant psychologist, draw upon their findings to develop recommendations for future policy, practice and professional development.

Citation

Wright, J.A., Newton, C., Clarke, M., Donlan, C., Lister, C. & Cherguit, J. (2006). Communication Aids in the Classroom: The Views of Education Staff and Speech and Language Therapists Involved with the Communication Aids Project. British Journal of Special Education, 33(1), 25-32. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from .

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