You are here:

The Quantitative Effect of Students Using Podcasts in a First Year Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Module
ARTICLE

,

Bioscience Education Volume 10, ISSN 1479-7860

Abstract

This study reports the quantitative effect of students using podcasts in a 1st year undergraduate exercise physiology module. From a cohort of 70 students, 50 volunteered and completed the study. Using a pre-post random allocation research design, students were allocated to either a podcast group (PG) or control group (CG) based on a 32-question multiple-choice exam. The PG then listened to six podcasts over six weeks, while the CG were provided with an exact transcript of the podcasts in printed form to ensure that both groups were provided with the same content. After six weeks, both groups were re-examined using the same test. Data were analysed using the effect size statistic and 90% confidence intervals. The CG improved their exam performance by 43%, whereas the PG improved by 46%. The difference between the groups on the post-test was a mean effect size of 0.19 (90%CI: -0.16 to 0.53 [trivial to positively small]). There is almost no chance that the true effect in the population is harmful. The results of this study suggest that using podcasts provides little quantitative benefit for students over and above written text when learning exercise physiology. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

Citation

Abt, G. & Barry, T. (2007). The Quantitative Effect of Students Using Podcasts in a First Year Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Module. Bioscience Education, 10,. Retrieved April 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 19, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Learning With Mobile Devices: An Overview

    Christopher Devers, Indiana Wesleyan University, United States; Stefanie Panke, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2017 (Oct 17, 2017) pp. 1709–1717

  2. Lecture Capture: Good Student Learning or Good Bedtime Story? An Interdisciplinary Assessment of the Use of Podcasts in Higher Education

    Lena Paulo Kushnir & Kenneth Berry, University of Toronto, Canada; Jessica Wyman, OCAD University, Canada; Florin Salajan, North Dakota State University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2011 (Jun 27, 2011) pp. 3168–3178

  3. Replacing Lecture with Podcasts: Effects on Student Achievement

    Blanche O'Bannon & Jennifer Lubke, The University of Tennessee, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2011 (Jun 27, 2011) pp. 1143–1151

  4. Using Podcasts to Replace Lecture: Effects on Student Achievement

    Blanche O'Bannon, Jennifer Lubke, Jeff Beard & Ginny Britt, The University Of Tennessee, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 2616–2623

  5. A Literature Review of Podcasts and Implications for Teacher Education

    Natalie Milman & Bryce Walker, George Washington University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2010 (Mar 29, 2010) pp. 3313–3318

  6. Podcasts in Higher Education: What Students Want, What They Really Need, and How This Might be Supported

    Rasmus Blok, Aarhus University, Denmark; Mikkel Godsk, Aarhus Universitet, Denmark

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2009 (Oct 26, 2009) pp. 117–128

  7. Impact of Podcasts in Teacher Education: from consumers to producers

    Ana A. Carvalho & Cristina Aguiar, University of Minho, Portugal

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2009 (Mar 02, 2009) pp. 2473–2480

  8. Influence of Podcasts Characteristics on Higher Students’ Acceptance

    Ana A. Carvalho, Cristina Aguiar, Carla J. Carvalho & Rosa Cabecinhas, University of Minho, Portugal

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2008 (Nov 17, 2008) pp. 3625–3633

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.