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Engaging By Design: How Engagement Strategies in Popular Computer and Video Games Can Inform Instructional Design
ARTICLE

Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 53, Number 2, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

Computer and video games are a prevalent form of entertainment in which the purpose of the design is to engage players. Game designers incorporate a number of strategies and tactics for engaging players in “gameplay.” These strategies and tactics may provide instructional designers with new methods for engaging learners. This investigation presents a review of game design strategies and the implications of appropriating these strategies for instructional design. Specifically, this study presents an overview of the trajectory of player positioning or point of view, the role of narrative, and methods of interactive design. A comparison of engagement strategies in popular games and characteristics of engaged learning is also presented to examine how strategies of game design might be integrated into the existing framework of engaged learning.

Citation

Dickey, M.D. (2005). Engaging By Design: How Engagement Strategies in Popular Computer and Video Games Can Inform Instructional Design. Educational Technology Research and Development, 53(2), 67-83. Retrieved April 19, 2019 from .

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