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Online Discussion Compensates for Suboptimal Timing of Supportive Information Presentation in a Digitally Supported Learning Environment
ARTICLE

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Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 60, Number 2, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

This study used a sequential set-up to investigate the consecutive effects of timing of supportive information presentation (information before vs. information during the learning task clusters) in interactive digital learning materials (IDLMs) and type of collaboration (personal discussion vs. online discussion) in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) on student knowledge construction. Students (N = 87) were first randomly assigned to the two information presentation conditions to work individually on a case-based assignment in IDLM. Students who received information during learning task clusters tended to show better results on knowledge construction than those who received information only before each cluster. The students within the two separate information presentation conditions were then randomly assigned to pairs to discuss the outcomes of their assignments under either the personal discussion or online discussion condition in CSCL. When supportive information had been presented before each learning task cluster, online discussion led to better results than personal discussion. When supportive information had been presented during the learning task clusters, however, the online and personal discussion conditions had no differential effect on knowledge construction. Online discussion in CSCL appeared to compensate for suboptimal timing of presentation of supportive information before the learning task clusters in IDLM. (Contains 1 table and 6 figures.)

Citation

Noroozi, O., Busstra, M.C., Mulder, M., Biemans, H.J.A., Tobi, H., Geelen, A., van't Veer, P. & Chizari, M. (2012). Online Discussion Compensates for Suboptimal Timing of Supportive Information Presentation in a Digitally Supported Learning Environment. Educational Technology Research and Development, 60(2), 193-221. Retrieved April 18, 2019 from .

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