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Engaging online learners: The impact of Web-based learning technology on college student engagement
ARTICLE

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Computers & Education Volume 54, Number 4, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Widespread use of the Web and other Internet technologies in postsecondary education has exploded in the last 15years. Using a set of items developed by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), the researchers utilized the hierarchical linear model (HLM) and multiple regressions to investigate the impact of Web-based learning technology on student engagement and self-reported learning outcomes in face-to-face and online learning environments. The results show a general positive relationship between the use the learning technology and student engagement and learning outcomes. We also discuss the possible impact on minority and part-time students as they are more likely to enroll in online courses.

Citation

Chen, P.S.D., Lambert, A.D. & Guidry, K.R. (2010). Engaging online learners: The impact of Web-based learning technology on college student engagement. Computers & Education, 54(4), 1222-1232. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved April 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 31, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.11.008

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