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A case study of the in-class use of a video game for teaching high school history
ARTICLE

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Computers & Education Volume 56, Number 2, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This study examines the case of a sophomore high school history class where “Making History”, a video game designed with educational purposes in mind, is used in the classroom to teach about World War II. Data was gathered using observation, focus group and individual interviews, and document analysis. The high school was a rural school located in a small town in the Midwestern United States. The teacher had been teaching with the game for several years and spent one school week teaching World War II, with students playing the game in class for three days of that week. The purpose of this study was to understand teacher and student experiences with and perspectives on the in-class use of an educational video game. Results showed that the use of the video game resulted in a shift from a traditional teacher-centered learning environment to a student-centered environment where the students were much more active and engaged. Also, the teacher had evolved implementation strategies based on his past experiences using the game to maximize the focus on learning.

Citation

Watson, W.R., Mong, C.J. & Harris, C.A. (2011). A case study of the in-class use of a video game for teaching high school history. Computers & Education, 56(2), 466-474. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on February 1, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.09.007

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