You are here:

Multimedia learning: Cognitive individual differences and display design techniques predict transfer learning with multimedia learning modules
ARTICLE

Computers & Education Volume 53, Number 4, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

In the wake of the information explosion and rapidly progressing technology [Mayer, R. E. (2001). Multimedia learning. Cambridge: University Press] formulated a theory that focused on human cognition, rather than technology capacity and features. By measuring the effect of cognitive individual differences and display design manipulations on performance, the current research evaluates the impact of multimedia combinations on college student transfer test performance. Results indicated that multimedia combination accounted for variance in transfer test scores beyond the impact of relevant cognitive individual differences. Findings demonstrated that text positioning and motion distraction accounted for the inferiority of transfer test performance in certain multimedia conditions. Research yields support for the notion that display design can split attention, increase cognitive load, and reduce transfer learning. Key design principles must be evaluated further before prescriptive guidelines for educational multimedia can be solidified.

Citation

Austin, K.A. (2009). Multimedia learning: Cognitive individual differences and display design techniques predict transfer learning with multimedia learning modules. Computers & Education, 53(4), 1339-1354. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 31, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.06.017

Keywords

Cited By

View References & Citations Map

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.