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Mission Impossible? Defining Roles, Developing Courses and Overcoming Myths in Distance Education
PROCEEDINGS

, New Mexico Tech, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-44-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Mission Impossible? Defining Roles, Developing Courses and Overcoming Myths in Distance Education

Proposal for a Short Paper Presentation
Submitted by Bob Boston

New Mexico Tech is a small (1,500 students) state sponsored research university in central New Mexico. We sit on a small, traditional campus offering traditional classes. But with competition in recruiting qualified freshmen becoming more intense, and the increase in the number of non-traditional students, the administration realized that something non-traditional was going to have to happen in order to assure a future for the school.

Distance Education was not necessarily a new idea at Tech. But implementing a viable program was. Over the years, Distance Education had become the longest four letter word on campus. We are still in the process of making Distance Education work. We have made mistakes and are hopefully learning from these mistakes. We have hit walls and are learning how to tear down barriers. We recognize that we are behind the curve with Distance Education when compared to other universities. But our mission is to bend the curve our way, learn from others, brainstorm new ideas and design and develop a viable working Distance Education program that will meet the needs of Tech and those whom we serve.

The purpose of this paper is to review and identify the process by which our Distance Education program is becoming resurrected. We will explore the trials ad tribulations by which we established administrative procedures, delineated responsibilities, attracted programming and students, and identifed niche markets that match our unique research and instructional roles in explosive and blasting engineering, anti-terrorism, teacher education in science, and mathematics.

New Mexico Tech's Distance Education program is on is way to becoming a viable, self-sustaining entity - Distance Education is no longer a program used just by other universities. Nor is it a program that is an option. It is the key to our survival. Mission Impossible becomes Mission Possible.

Citation

Boston, B.o.b. (2002). Mission Impossible? Defining Roles, Developing Courses and Overcoming Myths in Distance Education. In D. Willis, J. Price & N. Davis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2002--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 130-131). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 22, 2019 from .

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  2. Designing e-learning program for future educators: policies, technologies & cultural factors.

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