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Fostering historical knowledge and thinking skills using hypermedia learning environments: The role of self-regulated learning
ARTICLE

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Computers & Education Volume 54, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

In this study, we examined how high-school students utilized a hypermedia learning environment (HLE) to acquire declarative knowledge of a historical topic, as well as historical thinking skills. In particular, we were interested in whether self-regulated learning (SRL; Winne & Hadwin, 1998; Zimmerman, 2000) processing was related to the acquisition of declarative knowledge and historical thinking. We found that, using the HLE, participants did learn from pretest to posttest, and that they most often engaged in strategy use SRL processes. However, the frequency of participant use of planning SRL processes, not strategy use, was predictive of learning. This study has implications for how educators use HLEs to foster historical thinking skills, and suggests that scaffolding planning skills may facilitate students’ use of computers as cognitive and metacognitive tools for learning (Azevedo, 2005; Lajoie, 2000).

Citation

Greene, J.A., Bolick, C.M. & Robertson, J. (2010). Fostering historical knowledge and thinking skills using hypermedia learning environments: The role of self-regulated learning. Computers & Education, 54(1), 230-243. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved May 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.08.006

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Cited By

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    Scott Waring, University of Central Florida, United States; Courtney C. Bentley, The University of Montevallo, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 12, No. 2 (June 2012) pp. 184–208

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