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Educational Technology as a Tool for Multicultural Democratic Education: The Case of One U.S. History Teacher in an Underresourced High School
Article

, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 4, Number 4, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This case study analyzes the pedagogy of one U.S. History teacher as he prepared students for active and effective citizenship through multicultural democratic education in an underresourced alternative public high school. In particular, the paper examines his practice and focuses on his incorporation of educational technology (the Internet, multimedia technology, and word-processing applications) to achieve his pedagogical goals while teaching in a school with significant technology resources constraints. This study found that through the use of technology his practice stressed critical thinking, critical and multiple perspectives, and data manipulation skills that enable his students' abilities to work with information both in and out of school. This paper also encourages educators to proceed with caution in incorporating educational technology to promote multicultural democratic education given the continual existence of the “digital-divide” and underresourced schools.

Citation

Marri, A. (2005). Educational Technology as a Tool for Multicultural Democratic Education: The Case of One U.S. History Teacher in an Underresourced High School. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 4(4), 395-409. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.