You are here:

You Use! I Use! We Use! Questioning the Orthodoxy of One-to-One Computing in Primary Schools
ARTICLE

Journal of Research on Technology in Education Volume 44, Number 2, ISSN 1539-1523

Abstract

The current orthodoxy regarding computer use in schools appears to be that one-to-one (1:1) computing, wherein each child owns or has sole access to a computing device, is the most efficacious way to achieve a range of desirable educational outcomes, including individualised learning, collaborative environments, or constructivist pedagogies. This article challenges this notion, suggesting instead that 1:2 computing is an appropriate means of achieving such aims in primary school. It further suggests that 1:2 computing is preferable to 1:1 computing to achieve a balance between productivity, student engagement, social activity, and individualised learning. This article draws on data collected during the 2009 school year from four Year 7 classrooms (11- to 13-year-old students) with varied patterns of access to netbook computers. The researcher collected detailed information from two pieces of software installed in each computer and analysed the data through an Activity Theory conceptual and methodological lens. Recommendations from this research will assist school leaders in making informed decisions regarding 1:1 and 1:2 computing. (Contains 4 figures and 2 tables.)

Citation

Larkin, K. (2012). You Use! I Use! We Use! Questioning the Orthodoxy of One-to-One Computing in Primary Schools. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 44(2), 101-120. Retrieved April 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 19, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Making the Case for Personal Handheld Mobile Devices in Secondary Classrooms

    Joseph Riddle & Zack Underwood, University of North Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 44–48

  2. iPad Implementation Models in K-12 School Environments: An Exploratory Case Study

    Heejung An & Sandra Alon, William Paterson University of New Jersey, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (Mar 25, 2013) pp. 3005–3011

  3. Smartphones-Smart Students: A Review of the Literature

    Hans Friedel, Beth Bos & Kathryn Lee, Texas State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (Mar 25, 2013) pp. 1862–1868

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.