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After Installation: Ubiquitous Computing and High School Science in Three Experienced, High-Technology Schools
ARTICLE

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Journal of Technology, Learning, and Assessment Volume 9, Number 3, ISSN 1540-2525

Abstract

There are few studies of the impact of ubiquitous computing on high school science, and the majority of studies of ubiquitous computing report only on the early stages of implementation. The present study presents data on 3 high schools with carefully elaborated ubiquitous computing systems that have gone through at least one “obsolescence cycle” and are therefore several years past first implementation. The data from these schools shows how the elements of a 1:1, wireless environment are being deployed in these science classrooms, and the effects of the environment on science content, data analysis, labs and other uses for visualizations, and classroom interaction. While some positive effects are clearly seen in these classrooms, five years or more into the innovation, problems remain, and school cultural factors seem to play an important role in teacher uptake and integration of the technology. Implications for teacher learning are discussed. (Contains 13 figures and 3 tables.)

Citation

Drayton, B., Falk, J.K., Stroud, R., Hobbs, K. & Hammerman, J. (2010). After Installation: Ubiquitous Computing and High School Science in Three Experienced, High-Technology Schools. Journal of Technology, Learning, and Assessment, 9(3),. Retrieved April 18, 2019 from .

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Cited By

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    Daniella Smith, University of North Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 565–570

  2. Analyzing and Evaluating the 1:1 Learning Model: What Would Dewey Do?

    Danielle Boulden, North Carolina State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 874–881

  3. Large-Scale 1:1 Computing Initiatives: An Open Access Database

    Jayson Richardson, Scott Mcleod, Kevin Flora & Nick Sauers, University of Kentucky, United States; Sathiamoorthy Kannan, University of Malaya, Malaysia; Mehmet Sincar, University of Gaziantep, Turkey

    International Journal of Education and Development using ICT Vol. 9, No. 1 (Apr 19, 2013) pp. 4–18

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