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Using game-based inquiry learning to meet the changing directions of science education
PROCEEDINGS

, , , University of Sydney, Australia

ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference, Publisher: Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a study designed to develop pre -service teachers‘ skills and pedagogical understanding of how game-based learning can be used in a classroom. The study used a technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) conceptual model. 18 pre -service science teachers participated in the study that used Death in Rome, a point and click inquiry-based game to learn how to teach scientific inquiry. In the workshop the participants were required to complete several activities using game-based learning that included the evaluation of a range of online games and virtual worlds. Participants were required to complete pre -and post-tests. The results of the pre-and post-tests indicate that there was a significant shift in pre-service teachers‘ attitudes towards game-based learning as a result of the workshop. Overall, this study showed a positive change in attitudes towards game-based learning in science education.

Citation

Kennedy-Clark, S., Galstaun, V. & Anderson, K. (2011). Using game-based inquiry learning to meet the changing directions of science education. In Proceedings of ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference 2011 (pp. 702-714). Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education. Retrieved October 18, 2019 from .

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