You are here:

A Review of What Instructional Designers Do: Questions Answered and Questions Not Asked
ARTICLE

, , ,

CJLT Volume 31, Number 1, ISSN 1499-6677 e-ISSN 1499-6677 Publisher: Canadian Network for Innovation in Education

Abstract

The purpose of this literature review was to determine what evidence there is that instructional designers apply ID Models, as well as to establish what other activities and processes they might use in their professional activities. Only ten articles were located that directly pertained to this topic: seven reporting on empirical research and three case descriptions recounting development experiences. All ten papers pertained to process-based ID models. Results showed that, while instructional designers apparently do make use of process-based ID models, they do not spend the majority of their time working with them nor do they follow them in a rigid fashion. They also engage in a wide variety of other tasks that are not reflected in ID models.

Citation

Kenny, R., Zhang, Z., Schwier, R., Campbell, K. & Campbell, K. (2005). A Review of What Instructional Designers Do: Questions Answered and Questions Not Asked. Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie, 31(1),. Canadian Network for Innovation in Education. Retrieved April 22, 2019 from .

View References & Citations Map

References

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. What Do Students Think about Integrating Formal and Informal Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study

    Boshra, Fuad Zawawi, George Mason University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2018 (Jun 25, 2018) pp. 1400–1412

  2. What do instructional designers in higher education really do?

    Swapna Kumar & Albert Ritzhaupt, University of Florida, United States

    International Journal on E-Learning Vol. 16, No. 4 (October 2017) pp. 371–393

  3. A Symbiosis Between Instructional Systems Design and Project Management / Une symbiose de la conception de matriel pdagogique et de la gestion de projet

    Cheng-Chang Pan

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 38, No. 1 (Feb 22, 2012)

  4. Creative Needs Assessment in Instructional Design: Selected Examples

    Stefanie Panke, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2016 (Jun 28, 2016) pp. 349–353

  5. Tightening the instructional design belt: Evolution of instructional design processes for an economically feasible model of online education

    doug reid, Jianfei Guan & Rus Hathaway, Grant MacEwan University, Canada; Nathaniel Ostashewski, Curtin University, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2014 (Jun 23, 2014) pp. 1043–1048

  6. What is Expected for E-Learning Instructional Designers in China?

    Fan Yang, University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2013 (Oct 21, 2013) pp. 1613–1622

  7. Authenticity in the process of learning about Instructional Design

    Jay Wilson, University of Saskatchewan; Richard Schwier & Richard Schwier

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 35, No. 2 (May 11, 2010)

  8. Design models as emergent features: An empirical study in communication and shared mental models in instructional

    Lucca Botturi & Lucca Botturi

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun 15, 2006)

  9. A Symbiosis Between Instructional Systems Design and Project Management / Une symbiose de la conception de matériel pédagogique et de la gestion de projet

    Cheng-Chang Pan & Cheng-Chang Pan, The University of Texas at Brownsville

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 38, No. 1 (Feb 22, 2012)

  10. Instructional Design in Higher Education: Unifying Expectations and Responsibilities

    Adrienne Salentiny, University of North Dakota, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2012 (Oct 09, 2012) pp. 1567–1573

  11. Paradigm shifts at a new university: Designing for a fully online degree program

    Doug Reid, Kari Rasmussen & Ernestina Malheiro, Grant MacEwan University, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2012 (Jun 26, 2012) pp. 2207–2210

  12. Improving the Workspace Awareness of Authors in Asynchronous Collaborative Authoring of Learning Designs

    Dade Nurjanah & Hugh C. Davis, The University of Southampton, United Kingdom

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2012 (Jun 26, 2012) pp. 1366–1376

  13. Serious Instructional Design: ID for Digital Simulations and Games

    Katrin Becker, Simon Fraser University / Mink Hollow Media, Canada; Jim Parker, University of Calgary, Canada

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (Mar 05, 2012) pp. 2480–2485

  14. Design and Communication Patterns Observed in an eLearning Design Team: A Case-Study

    Chrysi Rapanta, Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland; Nicole Schadewitz & Georgy Holden, The Open University, United Kingdom

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2010 (Jun 29, 2010) pp. 356–365

  15. Paradigms shifts at a technical institute: Designing for a technology degree program

    Doug Reid, David Bryce, John Ewing, Anthony Ralston, Margaret Rhodes & Sheelagh Semper, NAIT, Canada

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2008 (Mar 03, 2008) pp. 3273–3275

  16. Current Major Competencies for Instructional Design and Technology Professionals

    Evren Sumuer, Engin Kursun & Kursat Cagiltay, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2006 (June 2006) pp. 1617–1622

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.